Design News N. 034

Design News is your tiny dose of design, technology and other important news, curated monthly by Interwoven Design. In this issue we take a dive into Yin Gao’s pulsating robotic garments, Virgil Abloh’s Royal College of Art Scholarship, Goldwin and Synflux’s Algorithmic system for zero fashion waste, and LG’s Stretchable Display.

Photos by Maude Arsenault, Courtesy of Studio Ying Gao

Ying Gao’s pulsating robotic garments portray virtual clothing

Ying Gao, the Montreal-based fashion designer, has recently released two garments that are inspired by the metaverse and NFT’s. The pieces are made of glass, precious metals, and silicone that motions in a twisting and pulsating pattern to create a visual effect for the virtual clothing. Specially designed woven, hand-screened and consolidated materials were used to create the polymorphic effect. This helps portray the flower-like volume, transparency and reflectivity. The title, 2 5 2 6, refers to the amount of hours the garments took to bring to life “from the first line drawn to the last stitch sewn.” Ying Gao continues on the forefront of the virtual clothing realm by pushing the boundaries of form and function through the perceptions of the digital world.

via Design Boom

Photo: Royal College of Art

Virgil Abloh’s RCA Scholarship

The Royal College of Art recently announced a full tuition scholarship that honors the late designer, Virgil Abloh, who passed away last year from cancer. The scholarship was founded to help underrepresented communities in the design industry by giving this scholarship to “an extraordinarily talented, but financially restricted, Black British student.” Virgil and the Royal College of Art had formed a relationship through creative collaboration and education while Virgil was an honorary visiting professor at RCA. The annual scholarship was established with the support of Shannon Abloh, Virgil’s wife, and will be given to a postgraduate student at the RCA School of Design.

via Dezeen

Photo: Rebecca Schley

Algorithmic system for zero fashion waste

Goldwin, a Japanese sportswear manufacturer and Synflux, a speculative fashion laboratory have been working on a collaboration that minimizes textile waste during the production process. ‘SYN-GRID’ uses Synflux’s proprietary technology combining machine learning and 3D technology. This production method allows brands to minimize waste while keeping the garments aesthetics, functionality and comfort. Product lines from NEUTRALWORKS and The North Face will be released this year using the Algorithmic Couture®. This environmentally focused collaboration aims to improve the fashion industry by helping future generations with sustainability in garment production.

via Design Boom

Photo: Kārlis Dambrāns

LG’s Stretchable Display Prototype

LG, unveiled the “world’s first 12-inch high-resolution Stretchable Display equipped with an outstanding free-form technology that enables it to be extended, folded, and twisted without distortion or damage.” The full-color RGB display has a resolution of 100 ppi and is the industry’s first display to achieve 20% stretchability. This innovation will allow adaptability to curved surfaces on the body, furniture or vehicles. LG’s Stretchable Display has the capabilities to enhance the future of fashion, wearable technology, mobility and gaming.

via LG

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What is the difference between a mockup and a prototype?

In our AMA (Ask Me Anything) series, industrial designer Rebeccah Pailes-Friedman answers questions about design and process from Instagram and LinkedIn. Rebeccah is the founder of Interwoven Design Group, a design consultancy that specializes in soft goods design and wearable technology. She has over 25 years of corporate design experience and has held positions as Design Director for Fila, Champion and Nike. She is the author of Smart Textiles for Designers: Inventing the Future of Fabrics, and speaks internationally on design, innovation and the future. In this issue she answers the question, what is the difference between a mockup and a prototype?

Watch the vide or read the transcript below for Rebeccah’s explanation for what is the difference between a mockup and a prototype.

What is the difference between a mockup and a prototype?

A PROOF-OF-CONCEPT prototype effectively gets the point across, quickly. Here at Interwoven, we make fast 3D sketches of mock-ups to determine function, scale, user interaction and many other things – these works-like prototypes focus on how it works. At the same time we often work on Looks-like prototypes that focus on the appearance of the product.  As we refine the design, the mock-ups increase in fidelity until we are making functional and appearance models. The final prototype combines the best of both of these into a fully functional prototype.

We will start working in paper, chipboard, EVA foam, and muslin then as the design evolves we will start to move into CAD for the hard parts and patternmaking for the textiles. We can cut, bend, perforate, hem, stitch and tailor anything relating to fabrics and textiles.

The final prototype brings together the Look-like aesthetic model and the functional Works-like model into a single streamlined prototype that is both aesthetically pleasing and fully functional.And here at Interwoven we specialize in wearable technology and soft goods. If you’re curious about what our work looks like, get in touch. You can follow us on our website or on our Instagram @interwoven_design.

Want to know more?

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How do we find the right materials for a design?

In our AMA (Ask Me Anything) series, industrial designer Rebeccah Pailes-Friedman answers questions about design and process from Instagram and LinkedIn. Rebeccah is the founder of Interwoven Design Group, a design consultancy that specializes in soft goods design and wearable technology. She has over 25 years of corporate design experience and has held positions as Design Director for Fila, Champion and Nike. She is the author of Smart Textiles for Designers: Inventing the Future of Fabrics, and speaks internationally on design, innovation and the future. In this issue she answers the question, how do we find the the right materials for a design?

Watch the vide or read the transcript below for Rebeccah’s explanation for how do we find the right materials for a design.

How do we find the the right materials for a design?

Traditional industrial and product designers understand the importance of selecting the right materials, such as plastics, resins, metals, foams and other rigid and semi-rigid materials for functionality, aesthetics, and ease of manufacturing. As soft goods designers we also take into consideration the textiles for each project.  It’s when combining rigid and semi-rigid materials with textiles to consider how they interact with each other. 

We have discovered that not many industrial designers or project managers realize that textiles have more variables to consider than most materials. Variables such as stretch, weave, stitch structure, chemistry, finishes, adhesives, melting points, dyes, elongation, recovery, pilling, crocking, yarn gauge, tensile strength, specialized equipment, yarn structure (and more!) that can affect the performance of a finished good.  As textile experts we can help select the best materials for each project.And here at Interwoven we specialize in wearable technology and soft goods. If you’re curious about what our work looks like, get in touch. You can follow us on our website or on our Instagram @interwoven_design.

Want to know more?

Do you have any questions about design? Let us know on social media! Be sure to sign up for our newsletter and follow us on Instagram and LinkedIn for design news, multi-media recommendations, and to learn more about product design and development.

Design News N. 031

Design News Category Image

Design News N. 031

Design News is your tiny dose of design, technology and other important news, curated monthly by Interwoven Design. In this issue: we take a dive into commercialized bioplastic vinyl records, Pauline van Dongen and Tentech collaborate on solar-energy-generating textiles, Bali’s Sustainable Art Space, Patagonia’s disbursement of resources to save the environment and the On’s inspiring CleanCloud™ story. 

Evolution Music's Bioplastic Vinyl
Photo: Evolution Music, “Music Made Better”

Bioplastic 12-inch Vinyl by Evolution Music

Evolution Music’s bioplastic 12-inch vinyl may look and sound like a traditional record but is actually the world’s first bioplastic vinyl that is commercially available. ‘Evolution Music’ have spent over 4 years working on research and development to find the appropriate material to replace the harmful elements in Vinyl LP manufacturing. The decision to use plant based bio-polymers and organic master batch creates a non-toxic production process for the compound. In addition, the final product ‘Evo-Vinyl’ is completely biodegradable compostable according to DIN EN 13432 (European Standards). The team at Evolution also took great care to settle on a Bon Sucro certified supplier to ensure a completely sustainable approach.

via Dezeen Awards

Photo: Pauline van Dongen

Pauline van Dongen to “create a new aesthetic for buildings” with solar textile

Pauline van Dongen along with Tentech are reimagining and developing textiles that could be used to create a new exterior for future buildings. Suntex is a solar textile that is energy generating while also being durable and water-resistant. The Dutch designer explains the construction of the textile that includes weaving organic photovoltaic solar cells along with recycled polymer yarns.

via Dezeen Awards

Photo: Nathan Congleton

Earth is now Patagonia’s only Shareholder

The founder of Patagonia, Yvon Chouinard originally got into producing climbing gear for his friends, not to be a businessman. The company began by donating 1% of their sales each year to altering the company’s purpose into saving the planet. Instead of selling Patagonia or making the company publicly owned,  the company decided to “go purpose” and gave the nonvoting stock to the Holdfast Collective, a nonprofit dedicated to fighting the environmental crisis.

via Patagonia

 Photo: Tommaso Riva, MoSA, Museum of Space Available, in Bali

Bali’s new Circular Design Workplace

The Museum of Space Available (MoSA), was created when the pandemic struck and made the space available. Former creative director, Daniel Mitchell, envisioned this new system located in southern Bali. The coastal sustainable community features space available for artists, designers and bio innovation scientists that result in exhibitions including physical art installations as well as NFTs.

via Wallpaper

Photo: on-running.com 

The CleanCloud from On

The CleanCloud™ story is one of trial and tribulation deserves a round of applause for the innovation team at On. It began by the team questioning if the problem of carbon emissions be a part of the solution to step away from using fossil-based materials. On and Technip Energies targeted the materials used and production of EVA midsole foam which is commonly used in the sole of shoes. Through a collaboration with Fairbrics, the midsole’s polyester is also made from carbon emissions and the outsole is the result of an innovative partnership with Novoloop, making materials from plastic waste.

via HYPEBEAST

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What is Wearable Technology?

Design is a broad, complex industry that isn’t well understood in mainstream culture. Industrial design, our specialty, is especially vast. In our new AMA (Ask Me Anything) series, industrial designer Rebeccah Pailes-Friedman answers questions about design and process from Instagram and LinkedIn. Do you have any questions about design? Let us know!

Rebeccah is the founder of Interwoven Design Group (that’s us!), an interdisciplinary design consulting practice that creates innovative, thoughtful and efficient products. She has over 25 years of corporate design experience and has held positions as Design Director for Fila, Champion and Nike. She is the author of Smart Textiles for Designers: Inventing the Future of Fabrics, is one of the founding partners of Space Exploration Architecture (SEArch+), and speaks internationally on design, innovation and the future.

Watch the video or read the transcript below for Rebeccah’s definition of wearable technology.

What is wearable technology?

Hi, I’m Rebeccah from Interwoven Design Group, and today you can ask me anything. The question that we’re going to work on today is: What exactly is wearable technology? 

Wearable technology is basically anything that you wear on your body that’s not necessarily clothing. It could be anything from your glasses to your smartwatch to something that’s going to help you improve your performance. I call it designing a superpower. 

If you’re curious about what we do here at Interwoven, you can get in touch. We’d love to hear from you. You can follow us on Instagram @interwoven_design or you can go to our website at getinterwoven.com.

Want to know more?

Here at Interwoven Design our design niche is the intersection of soft goods and wearable technology. We explained what soft goods design is, and you can check out our Insight article on wearable technology to learn more about that aspect of our work.

Sign up for our newsletter and follow us on Instagram and LinkedIn for design news, multi-media recommendations, and to learn more about product design and development!