What is the difference between a mockup and a prototype?

In our AMA (Ask Me Anything) series, industrial designer Rebeccah Pailes-Friedman answers questions about design and process from Instagram and LinkedIn. Rebeccah is the founder of Interwoven Design Group, a design consultancy that specializes in soft goods design and wearable technology. She has over 25 years of corporate design experience and has held positions as Design Director for Fila, Champion and Nike. She is the author of Smart Textiles for Designers: Inventing the Future of Fabrics, and speaks internationally on design, innovation and the future. In this issue she answers the question, what is the difference between a mockup and a prototype?

Watch the vide or read the transcript below for Rebeccah’s explanation for what is the difference between a mockup and a prototype.

What is the difference between a mockup and a prototype?

A PROOF-OF-CONCEPT prototype effectively gets the point across, quickly. Here at Interwoven, we make fast 3D sketches of mock-ups to determine function, scale, user interaction and many other things – these works-like prototypes focus on how it works. At the same time we often work on Looks-like prototypes that focus on the appearance of the product.  As we refine the design, the mock-ups increase in fidelity until we are making functional and appearance models. The final prototype combines the best of both of these into a fully functional prototype.

We will start working in paper, chipboard, EVA foam, and muslin then as the design evolves we will start to move into CAD for the hard parts and patternmaking for the textiles. We can cut, bend, perforate, hem, stitch and tailor anything relating to fabrics and textiles.

The final prototype brings together the Look-like aesthetic model and the functional Works-like model into a single streamlined prototype that is both aesthetically pleasing and fully functional.And here at Interwoven we specialize in wearable technology and soft goods. If you’re curious about what our work looks like, get in touch. You can follow us on our website or on our Instagram @interwoven_design.

Want to know more?

Do you have any questions about design? Let us know on social media! Be sure to sign up for our newsletter and follow us on Instagram and LinkedIn for design news, multi-media recommendations, and to learn more about product design and development.

How do we find the right materials for a design?

In our AMA (Ask Me Anything) series, industrial designer Rebeccah Pailes-Friedman answers questions about design and process from Instagram and LinkedIn. Rebeccah is the founder of Interwoven Design Group, a design consultancy that specializes in soft goods design and wearable technology. She has over 25 years of corporate design experience and has held positions as Design Director for Fila, Champion and Nike. She is the author of Smart Textiles for Designers: Inventing the Future of Fabrics, and speaks internationally on design, innovation and the future. In this issue she answers the question, how do we find the the right materials for a design?

Watch the vide or read the transcript below for Rebeccah’s explanation for how do we find the right materials for a design.

How do we find the the right materials for a design?

Traditional industrial and product designers understand the importance of selecting the right materials, such as plastics, resins, metals, foams and other rigid and semi-rigid materials for functionality, aesthetics, and ease of manufacturing. As soft goods designers we also take into consideration the textiles for each project.  It’s when combining rigid and semi-rigid materials with textiles to consider how they interact with each other. 

We have discovered that not many industrial designers or project managers realize that textiles have more variables to consider than most materials. Variables such as stretch, weave, stitch structure, chemistry, finishes, adhesives, melting points, dyes, elongation, recovery, pilling, crocking, yarn gauge, tensile strength, specialized equipment, yarn structure (and more!) that can affect the performance of a finished good.  As textile experts we can help select the best materials for each project.And here at Interwoven we specialize in wearable technology and soft goods. If you’re curious about what our work looks like, get in touch. You can follow us on our website or on our Instagram @interwoven_design.

Want to know more?

Do you have any questions about design? Let us know on social media! Be sure to sign up for our newsletter and follow us on Instagram and LinkedIn for design news, multi-media recommendations, and to learn more about product design and development.

What is Sustainable Design?

Design is a broad, complex industry that isn’t well understood in mainstream culture. Industrial design, our specialty, is especially vast. In our new AMA (Ask Me Anything) series, industrial designer Rebeccah Pailes-Friedman answers questions about design and process from Instagram and LinkedIn. Do you have any questions about design? Let us know!

Rebeccah is the founder of Interwoven Design Group (that’s us!), an interdisciplinary design consulting practice that creates innovative, thoughtful and efficient products. She has over 25 years of corporate design experience and has held positions as Design Director for Fila, Champion and Nike. She is the author of Smart Textiles for Designers: Inventing the Future of Fabrics, is one of the founding partners of Space Exploration Architecture (SEArch+), and speaks internationally on design, innovation and the future.

Watch the video or read the transcript below for Rebeccah’s definition of sustainable design.

What is sustainable design?

Hi, I’m Rebeccah from Interwoven Design Group, and today you can ask me anything. The question that we’re going to work on today is: What exactly is sustainable design? 

The basic objectives of sustainability are to reduce consumption of non-renewable resources, minimize waste, and create healthy, productive environments.  All of these objectives start in the design process. As designers we have a responsibility to prioritize these objectives when we work through any design process.  But the biggest challenge is when a client’s fiscal and sales goals are out of alignment with these objectives. The four pillars of sustainability are: people, environment, profit and culture. Ideally, as designers we are most effective when we can achieve these goals and meet or exceed a clients’ needs.

If you’re curious about what we do here at Interwoven, you can get in touch. We’d love to hear from you. You can follow us on Instagram @interwoven_design or you can go to our website at getinterwoven.com.

Watch the video or read the transcript below for Rebeccah’s definition of sustainable design.

Want to know more?

Here at Interwoven Design our design niche is the intersection of soft goods and wearable technology. We explained what soft goods design is, and you can check out our Insight article on wearable technology to learn more about that aspect of our work.

Sign up for our newsletter and follow us on Instagram and LinkedIn for design news, multi-media recommendations, and to learn more about product design and development!

What is an Industrial Designer?

In our AMA (Ask Me Anything) series, industrial designer Rebeccah Pailes-Friedman answers questions about design and process from Instagram and LinkedIn. Rebeccah is the founder of Interwoven Design Group, a design consultancy that specializes in soft goods design and wearable technology. She has over 25 years of corporate design experience and has held positions as Design Director for Fila, Champion and Nike. She is the author of Smart Textiles for Designers: Inventing the Future of Fabrics, and speaks internationally on design, innovation and the future. In this issue she answers the question, what is an industrial designer?

Watch the video or read the transcript below for Rebeccah’s definition of an industrial designer.

Rebeccah Pailes-Friedman answers the question, What is an Industrial Designer?

What is an industrial designer?

Hi, I’m Rebeccah, I’m an industrial designer, and I’m the brains behind Interwoven Design Group. I’ve been designing and making things for a long time. Today, you can ask me anything. We’ve been gathering questions from our social media and today I’m going to start with a question that we’re asked a lot. Exactly what is an industrial designer?

The way that I like to answer this question is: most people know what an architect, an interior designer, and a fashion designer are. Well an industrial designer is basically everything else. We create the things that you use every day. We can design everything from consumer products to household items, furniture…
And here at Interwoven we specialize in wearable technology and soft goods. If you’re curious about what our work looks like, get in touch. You can follow us on our website or on our Instagram @interwoven_design.

Want to know more?

Industrial design is a field that is not yet well understood in mainstream culture. It encompasses hundreds of market sectors and overlaps with many other fields.

Do you have any questions about design? Let us know on social media! Be sure to sign up for our newsletter and follow us on Instagram and LinkedIn for design news, multi-media recommendations, and to learn more about product design and development.

What are Soft Goods?

In our AMA (Ask Me Anything) series, industrial designer Rebeccah Pailes-Friedman answers questions about design and process from Instagram and LinkedIn. Rebeccah is the founder of and principal designer at Interwoven Design Group, a design consultancy in Brooklyn, NY. She has over 25 years of design experience and has held positions as Design Director for Fila, Champion and Nike. She is the author of Smart Textiles for Designers: Inventing the Future of Fabrics, and speaks internationally on design and innovation. In this issue she answers the question, what are soft goods?

Watch the video or read the transcript below for Rebeccah’s definition of an industrial designer, then check out our Insight article on this topic for a more in-depth explanation.

What are soft goods?

Hi, I’m Rebeccah from Interwoven Design Group. I’m back again for another Ask Me Anything. Today’s question is, what are soft goods? So soft goods are basically products that are made with textiles. They’re smushy and soft, and they can be anything from outdoor gear to a backpack to stuffed animals or furniture. What we do at Interwoven is wearable technology, products that are worn on the body. 

If you’re curious about what we do, you can get in touch, we’d love to hear from you. Follow us on Instagram or come to our website, getinterwoven.com.

Still curious?

Soft goods are a specific subcategory in the design industry that includes products made with primarily but not exclusively non-rigid (soft) materials. It is a major category that makes up a significant part of the US consumer market and is driven by innovation, form, and aesthetics. Please check out our article on soft goods design to understand this topic further.

Do you have any questions about design? Let us know on social media! Be sure to sign up for our newsletter and follow us on Instagram and LinkedIn for design news, multi-media recommendations, and to learn more about product design and development.