BioWear Project Exhibited at Coded Couture

Duggan and Fox continue

As discussed by curators Ginger Gregg Duggan and Judith Hoos Fox, of c2 – curatorsquared, “We are witnessing a period of intense experimentation with technology in fashion. No longer a tech insider term for computer programming, ‘coding’ is now in widespread use as both noun and verb.  While the term coding connotes the new and the now, the word ‘couture’ is undeniably tied to the past and to a sense of reverence.  Fashion that exists in the uncharted space between these two worlds is what arrests our attention.  Fashion that is neither fully populist nor 100% exclusive and precious, but is instead an unlikely merger of these two polarities; a design approach to customization that is sympathetic to the allure of haute couture, but with a methodology rooted in coding: this is where we locate Coded Couture.”

Duggan and Fox continue: “For New York based designer, Rebeccah Pailes-Friedman, customization becomes an outward translation of the wearer’s emotions as measured through changes in their heart rate.  When one becomes excited, scared or anxious, for example, one’s heart rate increases, but that biological response is not visible to the observer.  With Pailes-Friedman’s ‘BioWear,’ however, a heart rate monitor is configured to activate movement of the feathers on the garment in accordance with those changes, bringing new meaning to the ruffled feathers cliche.”

BioWear: A Kinetic Accessory that Communicate Emotions Through Wearable Technology presented at ISWC

BioWear

It is standard practice for elite athletes, scientists and astronauts to monitor biometric data to enhance their performance, behavior and communication. Today, these same practices are now common practice for everyone from the amateur athlete to health-conscious individuals.

This new-found interest in collecting and understanding our body information leads us to question what this new level of interactivity between our bodies and the objects we wear will become.  Smart textiles and embedded technologies can lead us to clothing that can do things we have yet to imagine. The BioWear project explores the boundary between what we wear and our emotional expression.

The BioWear project explores the use of wearable technology to create deeper and more authentic human-to- human communications by using body metrics to sense and display emotions. BioWear kinetic accessories collect the wearer’s physical data and use that information to manipulate the appearance, revealing the person’s inner, genuine state. BioWear also explores the relationship between the objects we wear and the messages that we communicate with our clothing and our bodies. As an extension of our physical bodies, BioWear raises questions about the future and the boundaries of communication through fashion design and technology.

My Shirt is Breathing: Intelligent Wearables – Fashion & Technology

My Shirt is Breathing

In a direct continuation of its attempt to decipher the complex relations between man, computer and the digital world, Beit Ha’ir Museum addressed blurred boundaries between the body and smart materials by commissioning a conceptual investigation of wearable technology and its present state of development.

The exhibition examined the concept of intelligent wearables — one of the most relevant contemporary expressions of the relationship between man and technology, particularly computer technology.

Rebeccah Pailes-Friedman’s commission for the exhibition was the BioWear project, a conceptual fashion accessory she created and embedded with sensors that monitor changes in the wearer’s heart rate, equating these to shifting emotions. Feathers attached to a leather harness move in different patterns and at different speeds in response to fluctuations in the heartbeat.

In addition to her own work, Pailes-Friedman also exhibited 6 student projects on wearable technology from personal wearable electronics to wearable experiments designed for astronauts in her ongoing NASA WEAR Lab research collaboration.

Light It Up! Workshop

Light It Up! in Galilee

Light It Up! in Galilee

The mission of Moona, A Space for Change, is to create a better socio-economic reality in the northern periphery of Israel by bringing together mixed communities around advanced technologies. Founded by Asaf Brimer, a former pilot in the Israeli Defense Force who served in the country’s aerospace industry for six years, the center brings together Arabs and Jews in the Galilee region to foster interpersonal collaboration and understanding and promote regional economic growth and development.

Rebeccah Pailes-Friedman brought the Light It Up! workshop to Moona, guiding local Jewish, Muslim and Bedouin youth through the process of creating a customized piece of wearable technology: an LED-powered pin. Students created their own design, sewed the pin body and then programmed attached LEDs to light up in specific patterns. As a hands-on example of how easy it can be to sew, use electronics and start creating code, the workshop demonstrated the way fashion draws on disciplines from art and design to STEM.

Creating Wearable Technology: Interdisciplinary Design in Practice

Interdisciplinary Design in Practice

Rebeccah Pailes-Friedman’s lecture about her work and experience in the lab and classroom at Brooklyn’s Pratt Institute focused on the BioWear project, a kinetic accessory that works with the body to sense and display emotions. The project brings together multiple fields of study, including fashion and industrial design, mechanical, electrical and computer engineering, and print, film and video media.

In addition, she discussed the design and development of multiple wearable technology research projects conducted with her students in collaboration with NASA and partner engineering schools. She addressed the challenges of working across disciplines and between institutions, and the rewards of creating multidisciplinary teams that learn to achieve more together than in silos.

Designing Wearable Technology for Astronauts

Creating Wearable Technology

“Creating Wearable Technology: Interdisciplinary Design in Practice”

Rebeccah Pailes-Friedman’s lecture about her work and experience in the lab and classroom at Brooklyn’s Pratt Institute focused on the BioWear project, a kinetic accessory that works with the body to sense and display emotions. The project brings together multiple fields of study, including fashion and industrial design, mechanical, electrical and computer engineering, and print, film and video media.

In addition, she discussed the design and development of multiple wearable technology research projects conducted with her students in collaboration with NASA and partner engineering schools. She addressed the challenges of working across disciplines and between institutions, and the rewards of creating multidisciplinary teams that learn to achieve more together than in silos.